Responsibility

The BBPA and member companies are committed to promoting a responsible drinking culture in the UK. Through a number of initiatives, such as Challenge 21, alcohol unit awareness campaigns, and working with partnerships including Pubwatch and Best Bar None, the industry has gone to great lengths to promote responsibility. All licensed premises can play a part to promote responsibility in our sector. Guidance for licensees on running responsible premises can be found below, including guidance on noise control, gambling, selling alcohol responsibly and drug use in pubs.

  • British Beer & Pub Association publishes new accessibility guidance for pubs on Purple Tuesday

    12 November 2019

    New guidance will help pubs welcome those with access needs  The British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA) has published new guidance for pubs, titled “An Open Welcome: Making your pub more accessible for customers”, which will help licensees make their venues as welcoming as possible for those with access needs. The guidance has been published on Purple Tuesday 2019, an international call to action focused on changing the customer experience for disabled people and improving awareness of their value and needs. An Open Welcome features advice for pubs ranging from employing people with disabilities, to training staff and importantly; the need for honest, up-to-date online information so that all customers can make an informed decision before they visit a pub. It also includes detailed information on Disability Confident, a scheme led by Department for Work and Pensions to help publicans hire disabled talent, and specific advice on making pub toilets accessible and better suited for disability needs. The BBPA has partnered with a number of organisations to develop the guidance, including Tourism For All, MotionSpot, VisitEngland, Guide Dogs UK and the Alzheimer’s Society. Case studies including pubs which have improved their accessibility are also included in the guidance, showcasing to others what can be done to improve their offer to disabled customers and the advantages of doing so.  The guide also includes tips and advice from charities on how pubs can cater to the whole community. On top of this, Government Disability Champion for the Tourism Sector, Chris Veitch, and Government Disability Champion for the design of ‘spaces & products’, Ed Warner, have also contributed forewords to the guidance. To support the guidance, the BBPA has been working alongside Tourism For All to develop a training pack looking at the importance of having an open and accessible pub. This training focusses on the importance of the ‘Purple Pound’ for the pub trade, what the law says about providing service to customers with disabilities, and how staff can provide a high quality and welcoming service to all customers, regardless of their disability. Emma McClarkin, Chief Executive of the British Beer & Pub Association, said: “Pubs are rightly known for being the heart of their communities, bringing people together under one roof. The hospitality of the pub extends to people with disabilities too. As a sector, we must continue to be as inclusive as we can be and highlight the accessibility of our facilities and their improvements. “Not only is it the right thing to do, but it also makes good business sense. 10 million people in England and Wales have some form of disability[1], with spending power worth £249 billion annually when combined with their families[2]. “This new guide will help licensees understand how best to help disabled customers and ensure their venue is as welcoming as possible. Euan MacDonald, Co-founder of disabled access review website Euan’s Guide, said: “We’re hopeful that this free advice provided by the British Beer & Pub Association will help pubs across the country make the necessary changes to improve their accessibility. We encourage all pubs to ensure that they are providing detailed, honest and up to date information on their venue’s accessibility online. This will help reduce unnecessary hassle and can encourage more people to visit.” Joel Young, Campaigns Officer at Guide Dogs, said: “With 19% of assistance dog owners that we surveyed highlighting that they had been refused access to pubs in the 12 months prior to April 2019, it is great to see the BBPA taking proactive steps to raise awareness of the access rights assistance dog owners have under the Equality Act 2010 and the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (Northern Ireland). We urge all publicans to review their policy relating to access for people with assistance dogs and, to consider the different types of assistance dogs that may enter their establishment.” Tamsin Fraser, Head of Community Engagement at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Going to the pub or popping out for a meal is an important social activity for people with dementia and with the number of people with dementia increasing, it is vital organisations better cater for customers affected by the condition. “Two-thirds of people with dementia live in their community yet many feel trapped in their own homes but the pub and hospitality sector has shown it shares our determination to ensure people with dementia are able to continue to do the things they love. “We’re delighted to see the Beer and Pub Association joining over 450 dementia friendly communities and organisations and uniting against dementia with Alzheimer’s Society to ensure they feel understood and better included in their communities.” The new guidance, titled “An Open Welcome: Making your pub more accessible for customers” is available for free on the British Beer & Pub Association website at: https://beerandpub.com/briefings/an-open-welcome/ An accessible version of the guidance is also available at: https://beerandpub.com/briefings/accessible-version-an-open-welcome/

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  • British brewers decrease their CO2 emissions by 42%

    21 August 2019

    Total CO2 emissions from the UK’s brewing industry have fallen by 42% in the last decade (2008 to 2018) – a reduction of 202,952 tonnes – according to new research conducted by the British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA). The research also found that the energy used to brew a pint of beer in the UK is now 20% less than it was in 2008. The water required to brew one hectolitre of beer has also reduced to an average of just 3.5 hectolitres. Separate data from the Environment Agency acquired by the BBPA also found that UK breweries now recover and re-use 98% of their waste.[1] The research, published in a new report by the BBPA, called ‘Brewing Green: A Greener Future for British Beer & Pubs’, comes as the UK’s brewing and pub sectors begin setting their next sustainability targets to meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. 100% of pub operators surveyed by the BBPA for the report stated that reducing food waste and improving energy efficiency was important or very important to them. When it came to food waste, all pubs surveyed said they had trained staff on how to reduce food waste, with 86% now offering smaller portion sizes to customers to help further reduce waste. When it came to improving energy efficiency, 83% of pub operators surveyed said they used insulated cellars in their pubs to reduce energy consumption. 71% also said they had smart meters installed in their pubs. Brigid Simmonds, Chief Executive of British Beer & Pub Association, said: “Britain’s brewing and pub sectors are amongst the oldest and most revered around the world. To maintain this reputation, we must brew our beer and serve our pub-goers in a sustainable way. “From reducing emissions to lowering waste, Britain’s breweries and pubs are determined to be world leaders in environmental sustainability and meet the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.”   Kristin Wolfe, Legal & Corporate Affairs Director at Molson Coors UK & Ireland, said: “As brewers we have an important role to play in helping to create a more sustainable future. We have always taken seriously our responsibility to brew sustainably and Our Beer Print 2025 sustainability targets are a testament to that commitment. We recently updated these targets with our new global packaging goals to reduce plastic in our packaging, which include our pledge in the UK to remove plastic from the packaging of our Carling and Coors Light brands by April 2021. “We have to take a truly comprehensive and ambitious approach to sustainability. We’re committing to achieving science-based targets to lower absolute carbon emissions by 50% within our own operations and by 20% across our value chain by 2025, which are aggressive enough to meet the 1.5 degrees Celsius pathway and the Paris Climate Agreement.”   David Paterson, Corporate Affairs Director, HEINEKEN, said: “We embed sustainability across our entire value chain at HEINEKEN, from growing the barley and apples that go into our beers and ciders, to working with our customers and licensees to serve a great quality pint as sustainably as possible. We’re working hard to reduce CO2, water and single use plastics in our own business. However, we’re also passionate about helping our customers to improve their sustainability and that’s where SmartDispense is making a real impact for licensees. In five years, its saved 72m pints of water and 207 tonnes of CO2, whilst being a part of the original closed loop system - serving a pint from a keg into a glass.”   Paula Lindenberg, UK President, Budweiser Brewing Group UK & I, said: “Taking a sustainable approach to brewing is critical for the future of our sector. That’s why sustainability is not just a part of our business – it is our business. “At Budweiser Brewing Group UK&I, sustainability is embedded across everything we do; from our farmers to our packaging, supply chain and operations. At our breweries, our investment in green technology has helped us to reduce our energy usage by 10% over the past year, while water consumption is down 13% compared to five years ago. “We strive to help make the world a better place and we understand that it starts with us.”    Dr Andy Wood, CEO of Adnams, said: “Sustainability has been in our DNA for decades and is ingrained in everything we do. As one of the most energy efficient breweries and distilleries in the UK, we enjoy learning from others and also sharing our sustainability stories to educate and inspire both ourselves and others to make changes. The trust of our customers, in what we do and how we do it, means so much. Our sustainability stories are real, worthwhile and all about doing the right thing.”   Simon Townsend, Ei Group Chief Executive, said: “As the UK’s largest pub company, becoming a greener business is of fundamental importance to us and we have introduced a number of tailored initiatives across our managed and leased and tenanted divisions to reduce our environmental impact. “As consumer focus on sustainable purchasing and responsible business increases, so does our continual pursuit of reducing energy consumption across our estate through adopting forward-thinking green initiatives. These include offering electric car charging points in pub car parks and targeted upgrades to heating and cooling equipment in pubs.”   [1] Environment Agency data, provided by individual pub operators to the Environment Agency

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