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  • Non-alcoholic beers to help see you through Dry January, as BBPA predicts 4.8 million pints of low and no alcohol beer will be sold across the month

    17 January 2020

    ‘Dry January’ has traditionally been viewed as a quieter month for the beer and pub industry, with consumers abstaining from alcohol and reducing their visits to the pub. However, driven by health-conscious consumers, demand for a greater range and quality of low alcohol and no-alcohol beers in the UK is greater than ever before. In fact, as a category, ‘low and no alcohol beer’ has grown by 232% in just five years (2013 to 2018).[1] During Dry January alone, the BBPA predicts that 4.8 million pints of low and no alcohol beer will be sold.[2] Whether on draught or off the shelf, for the 4.2 million people participating in Dry January who still crave a refreshing beer, the BBPA has highlighted a small example of the rapidly growing range and variety of non-alcoholic lagers and ales to satisfy all tastes.[3] [1] BBPA sales data [2] Prediction based on BBPA sales data [3] YouGov Poll, for more info see: https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/foodanddrink/dry-january-2019-a4017926.html   Some alcohol-free lagers and ales to see you through Dry January[1]: Heineken 0.0, Alcohol Free Heineken 0.0 is made from natural ingredients, brewed twice and fermented with Heineken's unique yeast strain before the alcohol is gently removed. The finished beer is balanced, clean and refreshing with a fruity flavour and soft, malty notes. Peroni Libera, Alcohol Free Peroni Libera 0.0% delivers a crisp and refreshing taste, with a delicate fruity aroma. First brewed with exclusive Nostrano dell'Isola maize, with a dedicated yeast strain then added without producing alcohol. This gives Peroni Libera 0.0% its signature hoppy characteristics and smooth finish. Budweiser Prohibition Brew, Alcohol Free Brewed in the same way as regular Budweiser, Prohibition Brew is a medium-bodied, flavourful, crisp American-style alcohol-free lager with a golden colour, a subtle honey aroma and a trace of citrus, punctuated by notes of malt and noble hops. A perfectly balanced, full-flavoured lager with a crisp, clean, fast finish. St. Peters Without Elderberry & Raspberry, Alcohol Free An alcohol free beer with the sweet, tangy, and pleasant fruitiness of elderberries, and the lingering taste of raspberries. A full-bodied and well-balanced beer with a smooth, subtly sharp bitterness. Harviestoun Brewery Wheesht, Alcohol Free A dark ruby ale complimented with aromas of chocolate, biscuit and dried fruit. These characters carry to the palate with roasted, chocolate and sweet malt all shining through. A velvety smooth mouthfeel with a soft lingering bitterness. Innis & Gunn’s Innis & None, Alcohol Free Produced by Scottish Brewery Innis & Gunn, Innis & None is brewed, but not fermented! This process results in a bold, zesty and thirst-quenching pale ale with all the hops and flavour you want from a craft beer, just without the alcohol! Commenting on the growing range of non-alcoholic beer, Emma McClarkin, Chief Executive of the British Beer & Pub Association, commented: “Those taking part in Dry January or reducing their drinking have plenty of alternatives from brewers and pubs to see them through the month. “The range and quality of non-alcoholic beers in the UK has never been better. Some are even available on tap in pubs, making them the perfect option for those doing Dry January who are thirsty for a pint. “It’s also important to remember that pubs are more than just places to drink. They now serve upwards of one billion meals a year, so anyone participating in Dry January can still enjoy a visit to their local for food and a non-alcoholic beer.” More non-alcoholic beers to try in Dry January: Cobra Zero, Alcohol Free Cobra Zero is an alcohol-free beer with the same smooth, rounded taste characteristics you'd expect from standard Cobra. Malty notes and cereal grains give it a yeasty, lasting flavour, combined with a prevalent hop presence. Carlsberg Nordic, Alcohol Free Nordic Golden Brew is an alcohol-free clear pilsner beer. The beer has a beautiful crystal clear and golden colour with a bubby foam. The taste is very well balanced and offers a nice body and easily quenches thirst, just like an ordinary pilsner. Beck’s Blue, Alcohol Free Beck's Blue is a light, crisp and refreshing non-alcoholic alternative to beer, with no compromise on taste. Golden in colour, it is a classic German-style pilsner lager with over 140 years of heritage.   Low-alcohol lagers and ales for those looking to reduce their drinking: Adnam’s Ghost Ship, 0.5% Adnam’s Ghost Ship is brewed with pale ale, rye crystal and cara malts, using citra and a blend of other American hop varieties, to create hauntingly bold citrus flavours. The beer has a lemon and lime aroma that perfectly complements the aromatic tastes of spicy Thai and Indian foods. Low Alcohol Old Speckled Hen, 0.5% Crafted by the master brewer of ‘Old Speckled Hen’, this refreshing low alcohol beer is brewed with fine ingredients to deliver taste and aroma evocative of the nation’s favourite premium ale but at 0.5% ABV. Brooklyn Special Effects, 0.4% Special Effects gets its bready sweetness from a blend of pale caramel, and dark roasted Munich malts, and its surprising nose from dry-hopping with Mosaic, Citra and Amarillo hops - a technique rarely used in alcohol free brewing. It tastes just like a regular beer, but therein lies the special effect: it's not. Lucky Saint 0.5% Unfiltered Lager Lucky Saint is born of Bavarian spring water, pilsner malt, Hallertau hops and a single-use yeast. Featuring ‘biscuity’ malts, it has a smooth, citrus hop finish. Nirvana Hoppy Pale Ale, 0.5% A go-to beer for everyday drinking, this pale ale uses chinook and cascade hops to deliver refreshing, light citrus and floral aromas and a dry, bitter finish.    

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  • BBPA responds to the Queen’s Speech

    19 December 2019

    The British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) has today responded to the Queen’s Speech in Parliament. Commenting on the Queen’s Speech, BBPA Chief Executive, Emma McClarkin said:   “Pubs are the heart of our communities, so the commitment in the Queen’s Speech to a change in the business rates system is welcome. Three pubs a day close their doors for good due to the tax pressures they face. It is right that the Government is addressing the issue of business rates since pubs pay 2.8% of the total rates bill despite accounting for just 0.5% of turnover. Reducing rates for pubs is an important step in the right direction. Such reliefs are vital until the fundamentally unfair system is completely overhauled.   “However, with 7 out of 10 drinks sold in a pub being beer, it remains the case that a freeze or cut in beer tax at the next budget is the most direct way of helping pubs stay viable, so we hope that the commitment to a review of alcohol duties encompasses this. It would also show that the Prime Minister is listening to the 230,000 supporters of the Long Live the Local campaign, which calls on the Government to cut beer tax to support local pubs and the communities they serve. It is imperative the new government recognises the strength of feeling on the matter.   “We await the detail on the proposed points-based immigration system but pubs are facing a serious skills shortage and clearly need access to talent from abroad. It is vital then that any post-Brexit, points-based immigration system recognises this, which is why BBPA will continue to be the leading advocate of the need for such access to talent for our sector.”

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  • BBPA publishes new 2019 cost benchmarking data for tenants and lessees

    28 November 2019

    The British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA) has today published the latest edition of its operating cost guide for tenants and lessees. The data is intended to help those wishing to take on a tenanted or leased pub business to be as well informed as possible about the current costs involved in running a pub. The BBPA’s guide provides valuable information for tenants and lessees on typical operating costs in the pub sector. The guide gives existing tenants and lessees the opportunity to benchmark their own business and compare their own costs against these published industry norms. The guide shows the average cost of running a leased and tenanted pub over a range of pub models based on turnover and business types. It covers a wide range of pubs, from those with little in the way of food sales, to those that are largely food-led, and takes account of the significant variations that exist in the cost base, even within those pubs that are broadly in the same category. As in previous editions, the guide’s input data and sources change each year, so the information should not be used to determine trends from year to year. The guide also makes clear that all pubs are unique and that actual costs incurred will be dependent on the different aims and styles of the business according to the location, the market and the skills of the tenant or lessee. As well as providing average costs, the guide also includes the minimum and maximum operating costs, providing a range of scenarios across different types of business. Commenting on the new benchmarking data, a BBPA spokesperson said: “Whether you already run a pub or are thinking of taking one on, this new report is a must-read. It includes essential information on the current costs involved in running a local pub and can be downloaded – free of charge – from our website.” The new benchmarking data can be downloaded from the BBPA website here.

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  • BBPA responds to Conservative manifesto

    25 November 2019

    The British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA), the leading trade association representing Britain’s Brewers and pubs, has today responded to the publication of the Conservative Party manifesto. The manifesto has outlined that the Conservative Party would: Cut business rates for small retail businesses including pubs Establish a £150 million Community Ownership Fund to help purchase community assets including pubs Review alcohol duty to ensure the tax system is supporting British drink producers Commenting on the manifesto, a British Beer & Pub Association spokesperson said: "Pubs are the heart of our communities, so the commitment to ease their tax burden is welcome. Three pubs a day close their doors for good due to the tax pressures they face. "On business rates, pubs pay 2.8% of the total rates bill, despite accounting for just 0.5% of turnover. Reducing rates for pubs is an important step in the right direction. Such reliefs are vital until the fundamentally unfair system is overhauled. “When it comes to community pubs, what is needed is investment and support. It is important that measures to bolster the rights of individual communities to purchase pubs do not act as a disincentive to invest in or operate a pub business. “The commitment to review alcohol duty to support British drink producers is very welcome. Beer tax is a particular burden for pubs where 7 out of 10 alcoholic drinks sold are beer, a lower strength British made product. Particularly as we pay 11 times more beer duty than both Spain and Germany. “A freeze or cut in beer tax at the next budget is the most direct way of helping pubs stay viable. It would also show that Boris Johnson is listening to the 220,000 supporters of the Long Live the Local campaign, calling on the next government to cut beer tax to support local pubs and the communities they serve. With a further 109,000 people also writing to their MP calling on them to support pubs by cutting beer tax, it is imperative the next government recognises the strength of feeling on the matter.”

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  • BBPA responds to Labour manifesto

    21 November 2019

    The British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA), the leading trade association representing Britain’s Brewers and pubs, has today responded to the publication of the Labour Party manifesto. The manifesto has outlined that the Labour Party would: List pubs as Assets of Community Value so community groups could buy local pubs under threat of closing Replace Business Rates with a land value tax Introduce four new bank holidays celebrating the four patron saints’ days Review the evidence on the effect of minimum unit pricing of alcohol Label alcoholic drinks with “clear health warnings” Commenting on the manifesto, Emma McClarkin, Chief Executive of the British Beer & Pub Association, said: “The Labour Party has rightly noted in its manifesto that too many pubs are closing. “When it comes to community pubs, what is needed is investment and support. It is important that measures to bolster the rights of individual communities to purchase pubs do not act as a disincentive to invest in or operate a pub business. “Given that seven in ten alcoholic drinks sold in a pub are beer, the most direct way of keeping pubs viable remains a cut in beer duty. This would answer the call of the 220,000 people who have signed the Long Live the Local petition calling on the next Chancellor to cut beer duty, supporting local pubs and the communities they serve. A further 109,000 people have also written to their MP calling on them to support pubs by cutting beer tax, showing the strength of feeling on the matter, which the next Government must recognise. “The current business rates system is hugely unfair on pubs – they pay 2.8% of the business rates bill, despite accounting for just 0.5% of turnover. A complete overhaul of the existing system is required, but at this stage it is not clear if Labour’s land value tax will directly help pubs. “Additional bank holidays will hopefully be a boost for the pub trade, and could be done in tandem with extended hours to give a further uplift. “Minimum Unit Pricing should be carefully evaluated before a proposal is considered in England. Particularly as it has only been in place in Scotland for just over a year. “As an industry, we already clearly label our products with health information including alcohol units and ABV, as well as signposting to Drinkaware where the full guidance on low risk drinking can be found.”

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  • BBPA respond to Liberal Democrat manifesto

    20 November 2019

    The British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA), the leading trade association representing Britain’s Brewers and pubs, has today responded to the publication of the Liberal Democrat’s manifesto. The manifesto has outlined that the Liberal Democrats would: Review the UK excise duty structure to better support whisky exports Replace Business Rates in England with a Commercial Landowner Levy based solely on the land value of commercial sites rather than their entire capital value Introduce minimum unit pricing for alcohol, taking note of the impact of the policy in Scotland Commenting on the manifesto, Emma McClarkin, Chief Executive of the British Beer & Pub Association, said: “Any review of UK alcohol taxation must include beer – a lower-strength, British-made product. “Beer tax is a particular burden for pubs as 7 out of 10 alcoholic drinks sold in them are beer and we pay 11 times more beer duty than Spain or Germany. “With three pubs a day closing their doors for good, cutting or freezing beer duty as part of a review of UK alcohol taxation is essential. This would answer the call of the 220,000 people who have signed the Long Live the Local petition calling on the next Chancellor to cut beer duty, supporting local pubs and the communities they serve. “The current business rates system is hugely unfair on pubs – they pay 2.8% of the business rates bill, despite accounting for just 0.5% of turnover. A complete overhaul of the existing system is required, but at this stage it is not clear if the Liberal Democrat’s Commercial Landowner Levy will directly help pubs. “The impact of Minimum Unit Pricing in Scotland should be carefully evaluated before a proposal is considered in England. Particularly as it has only been in place in Scotland for just over a year.”

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